what can i use instead of quick cooking tapioca

In this brief guide, we will address the query, “What can I use instead of quick cooking tapioca?” and answer other related questions like “What are the best substitutes that can replace quick-cooking tapioca?” 

What can I use instead of quick cooking tapioca?

You can use different flour or starch substitutes for quick cooking tapioca’. Tapioca goes very well with many recipes, however, there are many ways to substitute it with different types of flours or starch such as cornstarch, potato starch, arrowroot powder, all-purpose flour, almond flour, coconut flour, rice flour, and chickpea flour. 

Cornstarch


Corn-starch is one of the best substitutes for quick-cooking tapioca since it is tasteless and is usually used as a thickening agent. The powder is also sometimes added to processed foods either as a filler or to prevent food from losing its texture. 


It is made from refined corn and is naturally a gluten-free ingredient and is white in color. Its role is to improve and maintain the texture of a dish.

It is tasteless so its purpose is to only bind or thicken any recipe that is done by making a cornstarch slurry by mixing some tablespoons in some water and then pouring it into the recipe. Such as pie, dibs, soup, fried foods, gravy, etcetera.

Potato starch


Potato starch is starch that comes from potatoes and is white in color. To extract the starch, potatoes are crushed to release the starch grains known as leucoplasts. The starch grains are then washed and dried out to form the powder which becomes the potato starch.

Potato starch is a good substitute for quick-cooking tapioca since it is tasteless and it is used to thicken various recipes in cooking and baking, both savory and sweet recipes such as pies, stews, gravies, soup, dibs, sauces, etcetera. 

Arrowroot powder

Arrowroot starch comes from tropical plants such as the arrowroot plant and cassava. It is a gluten-free starch that is a great substitute for quick-cooking tapioca because a small amount of the powder can help thicken any recipe and hold it together. 


It is used to thicken or bind various recipes such as pies, stews, gravies, soup, dibs, sauces, etcetera.

All-purpose flour

All-purpose flour is a versatile and general use wheat flour. As the name suggests, all-purpose flour is suitable for all types of recipes.


It is one of the best substitutes for quick-cooking tapioca because we generally have it at home and it binds well with various recipes in both cooking and baking.


Almond flour 


Almond flour as the name suggests is made from almonds, it is a good substitute for quick-cooking tapioca as it is gluten-free and can help various recipes get thick. It is rich in protein, vitamin E, magnesium, manganese, fiber, etcetera.  



Almond flour works well with recipes such as cakes, brownies, puddings, cookies, and gravies and sauces. 

Coconut flour


Coconut flour is a good substitute for quick-cooking tapioca that is popularly used in many baked goods, it can also be used as a thickening agent in recipes such as soups, gravies etcetera.

Coconut flour is made from ground dried coconuts and is a little sweet in taste.

Rice flour

Rice flour is a form of flour made from finely milled rice. It is distinct from rice starch. It is also a common substitute for wheat flour. 


It can also be another good option that can be used as a substitute for quick-cooking tapioca starch since adding some in any recipe won’t mess with the flavor of the recipe and will help bind and thicken it.

Chickpea flour


Chickpea flour is made of chickpeas and is a good substitute for quick-cooking tapioca because it is low in carbohydrates and is also gluten-free. It is rich in protein, fiber, vitamins, minerals, iron, and folate. 


Chickpea flour works well with recipes such as cakes, brownies, nuggets, cookies, and gravies and sauces. 

What is tapioca?


Tapioca starch or tapioca flour comes from the cassava plant best known for the thick, chewy texture which lends to gluten-free recipes such as puddings, tortillas, crepes, gravies, sauces, brownies, cookies, pies, bread, rolls, cake, etcetera. 

Conclusion

In this brief guide, we have addressed the query, “What can I use instead of quick cooking tapioca?” and answered other related questions like “What are the best substitutes that can replace quick-cooking tapioca?” We have also highlighted the recipes that go well with each mentioned substitute. 



Citations 

https://www.healthline.com/
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/

Hi, I am Charlotte, I love cooking and in my previous life, I was a chef. I bring some of my experience to the recipes on this hub and answer your food questions.