Is Havarti cheese similar to mozzarella?

In this blog post, we will answer the following question: Is Havarti cheese similar to mozzarella? We will speak about the taste and use and of Havarti cheese. We will also talk about the best substitutes for mozzarella cheese. 

Is Havarti cheese similar to mozzarella?

Havarti cheese is distinctive, it has a spicy aftertaste, so we cannot say it’s similar to mozzarella cheese, which is more plain and soft. Havarti is a cheese made from pasteurized cow’s milk. Its dough is soft, pressed, and uncooked. It comes from Denmark.

With an intense aroma and a very delicate, buttery, and sweet flavor, Havarti cheese is especially appreciated to be eaten sliced ​​or in a sandwich without much else. Although its origins are to be found on the farm that master cheesemaker Hanne Nielsen established north of Copenhagen in the mid-19th century, many different types of 

Havarti cheese is produced today, seasoned with numerous ingredients such as blueberries, basil, garlic, and even coconut.

This typical Danish cheese is made from cow’s milk whose fat content ranges between 30% and 45%. The production of this cheese is particular since the paste resulting from separating the curd and the whey is washed several times before being placed in the molds and subjected to pressure. 

This gives Havarti cheese a unique and characteristic flavor. The resulting pasta will undergo a curing and aging process for between 4 and 18 months and its flavor, aroma, and texture properties change and intensify with the aging time.

What are some good substitutes for havarti cheese? 

Havarti cheese has a mild flavor and comes in the category of “washed curd” cheeses or table cheeses. Some good substitutes are: 

  • Tilsit cheese 
  • Monterey Jack 
  • Esrom (Danish Port Salut) 
  • Gouda 

Organoleptic properties of Havarti cheese

Havarti is not a strong-flavored cheese, but rather delicate with a mild acid touch. Its aroma is buttery and pleasant, reminiscent of Swiss cheeses. Its interior shows irregular and small holes and its rind is thin. Being made with fresh milk, it has a high content of calcium and vitamin B12, which makes it a perfect cheese for children.

Havarti cheese is usually marketed in a square shape for slicing or already cut. Due to its square shape and its intense aroma, it is an ideal cheese to use in cold sandwiches accompanied by dates, cucumber, or dill and in hot sandwiches, as in the famous mixed sandwich. 

At breakfast, it becomes the perfect protein to accompany fruit and carbohydrates. Try rolling a slice of Havarti on wild asparagus for a healthy dinner, and pair it with a glass of white or rose wine for a more special occasion. 

There are numerous variations of this cheese on the market, each one more flavorful and risky: Havarti cheese with cranberries, Havarti cheese with jalapeño, Havarti cheese with dill … Finally, take note of this combination that takes the term fusion to its extreme: Havarti cheese quesadillas.

Other FAQs about Mozarella which you may be interested in.

Can you freeze mozzarella?

Can you freeze fresh mozzarella?

Can you freeze mozzarella cheese?

What is havarti cheese similar to?

Havarti cheese is a danish cheese. It has a buttery flavor similar to Tilsit cheese, which is its best substitute. Other types of cheese that can be used as substitutes include: 

  • Saint Paulin 
  • Monterey Jack 
  • Gouda 
  • Esrom

Which cheese is similar to Havarti?

Some of the cheeses similar to Havarti include Tilsit, Monterey Jack, and Esrom. Tilsit is readily available cheese with incredible taste. Monterey Jack and Esrom both carry a very similar flavor to Havarti. Any of these can be good substitutes for Havarti.

Which cheeses are similar to mozzarella?

In terms of texture and taste, there are many kinds of cheese similar to mozzarella and can be used instead as a substitute. Some of these excellent alternatives include Provolone, Ricotta, Gouda, Feta, Fontina, White Cheddar, and Swiss.

Also when you substitute the mozzarella with another cheese, just heat it a little in the microwave, and you will see if you like the taste or not. 

Baking and cooking mozzarella has no substitute, but with trial and error, you may find some mild semi-sweet cheese to your liking.

Can all cheeses melt?

Each cheese is unique. Several compositional factors such as the water and fat content, the method of coagulation, the possible cooking methods, the time, and the method of maturation have an influence on its personality and the ways of using it in cooking.

In general, the greater the water and fat content, the more fragile the structure formed by the milk proteins: the cheese then melts more easily.

But this is not the only explanation. “Fresh” cheeses like ricotta or feta, although they have a high water content, melt very poorly. When heated, these cheeses tend to grill and dry out rather than melt.

So which cheeses here are good to melt? It depends on the recipe. On a pizza, for example, there are endless possibilities, depending on the inspiration of the cook. For a more traditional version, you can opt for mozzarella with tomatoes and basil, otherwise, a mascarpone melted on broccoli and bacon – you’re in heaven! 

Cheddar from here, Gouda from here, and Swiss from here are also my favorite cheeses when it comes to gratinating a baking dish. It is a cheese with more depth, which gives a veggie punch. Everything is allowed, as you wish!

Final thoughts

We remind you that Havarti cheese is not very similar to mozzarella. Havarti is an ideal cheese to use in cold sandwiches accompanied by dates, cucumber, or dill and in hot sandwiches, as in the famous mixed sandwich. 

At breakfast, it becomes the perfect protein to accompany fruit and carbohydrates. Try rolling a slice of Havarti on wild asparagus for a healthy dinner, and pair it with a glass of white or rose wine for a more special occasion. 

As a good substitute for mozzarella you can use Monterey Jack, Colby, Cheddar, (smooth), Provolone, or Gouda cheese.

If you have any comments or questions on the content, please let us know. 

References

Food.ndtv.com

Food.com