Can you substitute instant yeast for active dry yeast?

In this article, we will answer the question “Can you substitute instant yeast for active dry yeast?”, and what are the different types of yeast?

Can you substitute instant yeast for active dry yeast?

Yes, you can substitute instant yeast for active dry yeast. Follow the steps below to substitute the right amount of instant yeast for its active counterpart.

  • Multiply the amount of active dry yeast in the recipe by 0.75. It will give you the amount of instant yeast you need to use in place of active dry yeast. 
  • 1 package or sachet active dry yeast (2 1/4 teaspoons) = 1 2/3 teaspoons instant yeast
  • 1 teaspoon active dry yeast = 3/4 teaspoon instant yeast

Reduce the time of proofing by 10-15 minutes when you are using instant yeast instead of active dry yeast. Because as the name suggests, instant yeast will make the dough rise rapidly.

What is the difference between instant yeast and active dry yeast?

Instant yeast, or quick-rise or fast-acting yeast, has a smaller grain size and a greater number of live yeast cells per unit volume than active dry yeast. As the name suggests, this yeast needs no time for rehydration and is directly poured into the dough mixture. It has low moisture levels and does not require to be proofed beforehand.

Active dry yeast, developed by Fleischman’s Company, is relatively stable than other forms of yeast and has bigger grains than instant yeast. It is sold in its dormant form and requires proofing before adding to the dough. Active dry yeast needs to be proofed before adding it to the recipe. For proofing, let the yeast sit in warm water, milk, or beer along with some sugar or honey. When the yeast produces thick foam on the liquid surface, it is an indication that the yeast is alive.

Different types of yeast

Osmotolerant yeast

High salt and sugar concentration hinder yeast growth. Hence, in bread with higher sugar content, osmotolerant yeast comes to the rescue.

Cream yeast

Cream yeast is just compressed yeast in a liquid state. This compressed yeat slurry is widely used by bread industries.

Brewer’s yeast

As the name suggests, it is used by breweries to make alcohol. Brewer’s yeast is also used for its nutritional benefits. It keeps the digestive system healthy and has considerable amounts of chromium.

Rapid-rise yeast

It is a type of instant yeast but with a smaller grain size and a greater dissolution rate. It provides a pronounced carbon-dioxide yield.

Compressed yeast

It is basically dry cream yeast shaped into small or large blocks wrapped with foil. Despite being very perishable, it is still used in bakeries.

How to swap different types of yeast?

Swapping active dry yeast with instant yeast

Follow the equations below to substitute the right amount of active dry yeast with instant yeast.

1 package or sachet of active dry yeast = about 2 1/4 teaspoons = 1/4 ounce = 7 grams

For substituting active dry yeast for instant (bread machine) yeast in a recipe, multiply the amount of yeast by 1.25.

  • 1 teaspoon instant yeast = 1 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast.
  • 1 teaspoon active dry yeast = 3/4 teaspoon instant yeast
  • 1 package or sachet instant yeast (2 1/4 teaspoons or 7 grams) = 1 1/4 package active dry yeast (2 4/5 teaspoons or almost 9 grams).

Swapping dry yeast with fresh yeast

Follow the equations below to swap the right amount of fresh yeast with dry yeast.

  • 7 grams instant yeast = 1/4 ounce instant yeast = 2 1/4 teaspoons instant yeast = 21 grams fresh yeast or 1 1/4 block (0.6-ounce size) or about 1/2 block (2-ounce size) fresh yeast.
  • 1 teaspoon instant yeast (3 grams) = 1/2 block (0.6 ounce size) fresh yeast.
  • 7 grams of active dry yeast = 2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast = 17.5 grams fresh yeast = 1 block (0.6-ounce size) or 1/3 block (2-ounce size) of fresh yeast.
  • 1 teaspoon active dry yeast = 1/3 block (0.6-ounce size) of fresh yeast.

Before using fresh yeast in your recipe, proof it in warm water with sugar. When the liquid starts giving off a yeasty smell and bubbles up, add it to your dough. The other method is to poke a hole in the center of the dry ingredients and add yeast along with the liquid ingredients and sugar. Let it sit until it foams up. Mix it with the dry ingredients when it becomes foamy,

Conclusion

In this article, we answered the question “Can you substitute instant yeast for active dry yeast?”, and what are the different types of yeast?

References

https://www.thespruceeats.com/baking-yeast-dry-and-fresh-yeast-measurements-1446706

https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/food-recipes/cooking/a32950543/yeast-active-dry-vs-instant/

Sana Ameer

Hello, I'm Sana Ameer. I'm a student of Food Science and Technology at UVAS. I like to bake and I aspire to become a Food blogger.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *