Can you put milk in an electric kettle?

In this brief guide, we are going to answer the question “Can you put milk in an electric kettle” with an in-depth analysis of can you put milk in an electric kettle. Moreover, we will have a brief discussion about reasons why milk is not suitable to be placed in a kettle as well as what to do if you don’t have any other choice except an electric kettle.

With ready-to-use heated water, an electric kettle makes life easier. Not only can you create your favorite tea or coffee with ease, but you can also use warm water to make fast soups, sterilize bottles for toddlers, and even cook eggs.

So if you are in search of an answer to whether you can put milk in an electric kettle, then you need not worry as we are going to answer all your questions.

So without much ado, let’s dive in and figure out more about it. 

Can you put milk in an electric kettle?

No, electric kettles aren’t meant to be used to boil milk. They are designed specifically for heating water. One can get carried away with this time-saving and convenient technique of heating water and wonder if they could use this handy gadget for something else, such as boiling milk. 

Reasons why milk is not suitable to be placed in Kettle

Although the idea is appealing, electric kettles are not designed for this use. These are the reasons why boiling milk in an electric kettle is not a smart idea. Instead of evaporating, milk may spill, the milk is being burned because the kettle would not shut off, milk traces are left behind, a stinky smell.

Instead of evaporating, milk may spill

Water and milk are significantly different in terms of their characteristics. When milk is boiled, unlike water, it does not evaporate and may spill, making a large mess. Water, lipids, and protein make up milk, which is a complicated composition. 

When water is heated, fat and protein separate, generating a layer above the water that prevents evaporation. This is what causes milk to boil over. This excess of liquid may cause a short circuit in the kettle’s electric base, potentially destroying the kettle.

Milk is being burned

When steam reaches the top of the kettle, it rushes down a tube, expanding a bimetallic plate, which trips the switch. Because there isn’t much steam coming out of the milk due to the fat and protein layer, the kettle does not shut off and continues to boil the milk, which may boil over, until the water has evaporated and the remaining fat and protein have been burned inside.

Milk traces are left behind

Milk will adhere to the inside of the kettle when heated because it contains fat and protein. These sticky traces will be tough to remove if your kettle is not designed to allow you to simply scrub every surface. It will get stuck in the nooks and crannies of your kettle, compromising its functionality. Milk deposits on heat sensors can cause them to malfunction.

A stinky smell

Not only will milk leave traces behind, making cleaning difficult, but the burnt milk inside your kettle will also leave a terrible odor, similar to burnt cheese, spoiling the taste and aroma of your other drinks.

So, for the reasons stated above, a kettle is not ideal for boiling milk. However, several kettle types on the market are suitable for boiling milk. If you frequently reheat milk and water in the kettle, you can purchase them.

What to do if you don’t have any other choice except an electric kettle?

Even so, if you need to boil milk in a kettle, there are a few options.

First and foremost, do not close the lid. With the cover on, pressure will build up, and as we all know, milk expands and can boil over. If you don’t have a lid, you can turn off the kettle as soon as the milk starts to rise, avoiding a huge mess.

Indirect heat is another option. Fill a kettle halfway with water, then pour the milk into a glass, preferably one made of steel, and immerse it in the water. The hot water will reheat the milk without causing it to burn or leave any residue.

So, unless you’re using a kettle specifically designed to boil milk, boiling milk in an electric kettle isn’t recommended. Because milk does not evaporate as quickly as water, it may boil over and cause a short circuit hazard if it gets into the kettle’s electric base. Milk fat and protein attach to the base and walls of the kettle, perhaps causing them to burn.

These charred remnants are difficult to remove, and they also give your kettle a sour milk odor. You can prevent spillage by warming the milk with an open lid while staying close by.

You can read how do electric kettles work here.

Conclusion

In this brief guide, we answered the question “Can you put milk in an electric kettle” with an in-depth analysis of can you put milk in an electric kettle. Moreover, we also have a brief discussion about reasons why milk is not suitable to be placed in Kettle as well as what to do if you don’t have any other choice except an electric kettle.

Citations

https://www.quora.com/Can-we-boil-milk-in-a-water-kettle

Mahnoor Asghar is a Clinical Nutritionist with a bachelor's degree in Nutrition and Dietetics. She is compassionate and dedicated to playing her part in the well-being of the masses. She wants to play a fruitful role in creating nutrition and health-related awareness among the general public. Additionally, she has a keen eye for detail and loves to create content related to food, nutrition, health, and wellness.