Can you eat haggis when pregnant?

In this article we are going to answer the question: can you eat haggis when pregnant, what is haggis, what is its nutritional fact, what is the risk of eating haggis when pregnant, and why is it outlawed in the US, and what is the recipe for haggis. 

Can you eat haggis when pregnant?

No, you can’t eat haggis when pregnant as long as it is made with the original recipe. The NHS recommends that pregnant women not eat liver because of its high content of vitamin A, which can harm the unborn baby. Haggis has a liver so you can’t eat it. 

You can eat haggis available in the supermarkets or make your own without liver and lungs. 

What is a haggis?

Haggis is a national dish originally from Scotland. Is a type of pudding made with the liver, heart, and lungs of a sheep (or another animal). They are all minced and mixed with beef or mutton suet and oatmeal and seasoned with onion, cayenne, and other spices. The whole mixture is packed into a sheep’s stomach and boiled. 

It tastes: meaty, earthy, gamey, livery, peppery, and spicy. 

What is the nutritional fact of haggis?

1 serving contains 

Calories403 cal
Carbohydrates25 g
Protein14 g
Fats28 g
Sodium3 g
Vitamin A2340 ug (293 % RDI)

What is the risk of eating haggis when pregnant?

Because haggis has too much vitamin A it’s very dangerous for the unborn baby. Excess vitamin A intake has been linked with congenital malformations involving the central nervous system and cardiovascular system and spontaneous abortion. 

Also, Haggis has a sheep’s lung that may contain tuberculosis. Tuberculosis in pregnant women is very dangerous. It is a substantial risk of morbidity for both the mother and the baby. 

Active tuberculosis was associated with nine times greater risk of miscarriage. 

What is haggis outlawed in the US?

Haggis has been banned from the United States since 1971 because of the inclusion of sheep as the US Department of Agriculture has labeled lungs as an inedible animal by-product because of the risk of carrying tuberculosis. 

What is the recipe for haggis?

The original recipe has

  • Heart/lung/liver of lamb
  • Beef or lamb minces or trimmings
  • Onion
  • Oatmeal
  • Suet
  • Salt
  • Black pepper
  • Nutmeg
  • Coriander

Here is a recipe for vegan Haggis that you can eat even if it doesn’t taste the same. 

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 2 onion chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 2 carrots, grated
  • 250 g mushrooms, chopped
  • 25 g sunflower seed
  • 1 ½ tsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/2 tsp white pepper
  • 1 tsp Marmite
  • 50 g pearl barley, rinsed
  • 50 g porridge oats
  • 150 suet

Fry the onion gently, add the garlic, grated carrot, chopped mushrooms, and sunflower seed. Season with salt and black pepper, and add other spices. Let it cook for 5 minutes.

Add the marmite and pearl barley and 200 ml of water. Bring to boil, cover, and cook for 30 minutes.

Take the pan off the heat and pour the mixture into a large roasting tin. Once cold, stir in the lentils, oats, and vegetable suet

When you want to cook the haggis, spread it out on a large piece of baking parchment. Shape it into a log then roll the paper up and twist the ends so it is completely sealed. Wrap up in muslin and tie the ends securely with string. 

Heat a large pan of boiling water and bring the haggis into it slowly. Reduce the heat and let it boil for one hour. Unwrap the parcel and serve with neeps and tatties. 

Here is another link to another vegetarian haggis! take a look and let me know what you think. 

Conclusion

This article answered the question: can you eat haggis when pregnant, what is haggis, what is its nutritional fact, what is the risk of eating haggis when pregnant, why is it outlawed in the US, and what is the recipe for haggis. 

If you have any questions please let me know!

Citation

https://www.netmums.com/pregnancy/can-you-eat-haggis-when-pregnant

https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/articles/what_you_should_and_shouldnt_eat_in_pregnancy#:~:text=Liver%2C%20 haggis%20and%20p%C3%A2t%C3%A9,an%20 added%20danger%20of%20listeria.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6470929/#:~:text=The%20main%20adverse%20effects%20associated,abortion%20%5B12%2C13%5D.

https://www.wildernessscotland.com/blog/guide-to-haggis/

What was missing from this post which could have made it better?

Hi, I am Charlotte, I love cooking and in my previous life, I was a chef. I bring some of my experience to the recipes on this hub and answer your food questions.