Can you eat capers out of the jar?

In this short article, we will provide an answer to the question, “Can you eat capers out of the jar?” with an in-depth analysis of capers, ways to safely cook and consume capers and how to properly store capers. Moreover, we will discuss the nutritional contents of carpers along with the health benefits and risks of eating capers. 

Can you eat capers out of the jar? 

Yes, you can not eat capers out of the jar, but make sure to rinse them before eating to remove excess salt. 

Although capers do not require cooking, salt-packed capers require to be washed thoroughly before eating as they are usually unbearably salty.

What are capers?

Capers are the unripened, young flower buds of the caper plant, scientifically known as Capparis spinosa. Capers are rich in flavour. 

Raw capers are unbearably bitter, but once preserved in a vinegar brine or salt, they exhibit an extraordinary flavour that is all at once salty, bitter, herbal, and slightly therapeutic. 

Capers are available as vinegar-brined or salt-packed. Brined capers have the benefit of nearly unlimited shelf life, but vinegar intensifies their taste. 

On the other hand, salted capers have a pure flavour, but they do not have a longer shelf life because the salt ultimately draws out all the moisture content. 

Capers taste particularly good with fish and other dishes that tend to have a rich rich flavour.

The nutritional value of capers

A 100 grams serving of capers provide:

  • Calories: 96 KJ 
  • Carbohydrate: 5 grams 
  • Sugar: 0.4 grams 
  • Dietary fibre: 3 grams
  • Fat: 0.9 gram 
  • Protein: 2 grams
  • Vitamin C: 4 mg 
  • Vitamin A: 138 IU 
  • Vitamin K: 24.6 mg
  • Vitamin E: 0.88mg
  • Niacin: 0.652 mg 
  • Riboflavin: 0.139 mg
  • Iron: 1.7 mg, 
  • Sodium: 2960 mg
  • Potassium: 40 mg 

The health benefits of capers

Antioxidant Properties

Capers consist of a good amount of flavonoid compounds such as rutin and quercetin. Both these substances have exceptional antioxidant properties thus they prevent free radical formation, which can cause cancer and skin related diseases.

Rutin supports the continuous circulation of blood and helps in the treatment of strained blood vessels. While quercetin has analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and anti-carcinogenic properties.

Essential minerals

Capers consist of essential minerals including iron, calcium, copper and high levels of sodium.

Calcium benefits in developing strong bones, and teeth.

Copper is a mineral that works in conjunction with certain proteins to synthesize enzymes that act as catalysts to help in a variety of body functions.

Iron helps in oxygen transport and storage. It helps our body to properly digest food.

Rich source of Vitamins

Capers are rich in vitamin A, vitamin K, niacin, and riboflavin.

Vitamin A helps to improve eyesight and reduces the risk of some cancers. It also helps our body fight against infection and retains our immunity.

Vitamin K, on the other hand, plays an important role in bone health. It reduces the risk of blood clotting.

Niacin defends against cardiovascular diseases and supports cognitive functions and also helps the nervous and digestive systems.

Riboflavin helps to keep us energetic. It also supports adrenal function, thus maintaining a healthy nervous system.

Reduces constipation

Capers are rich in fibre which helps in reducing constipation.

Bad enzyme killer

Capers destroy certain byproducts obtained from meat and fat-rich foods. These byproducts are often associated with cancer and cardiovascular disease.

Rheumatism Relief

In the past, capers have been effectively used as a treatment for rheumatic pain.

Reduces flatulence

Caper soothes stomach pains and flatulence. In addition, capers are eaten for increasing appetite.

Control diabetes 

Capers help to manage diabetes. They contain chemicals that help to keep blood sugar levels in control. 

Congestion Relief

Capers also prevent chest congestion and overcome phlegm.

How to prepare capers?

Always make sure to rinse brined capers before consuming. Salt-packed capers are way too salty to be eaten straight out of the jar. Keep them soaked in cold water for almost fifteen minutes and wash them in water thoroughly. 

If the capers are big, you can chop them unevenly unless you want a big burst of caper flavour. To use them as a garnish or in salads, pat them dry and then lightly fry them in some olive oil to make them crispy.

Ways to add capers to your diet

You can add capers in:

  • Salads 
  • Soups 
  • Eggs
  • Oysters
  • Salmon
  • Salsa/ Nachos
  • Canned/Jarred Fish
  • Herby Condiments
  • Sandwiches and Wraps
  • Pasta

Conclusion 

In this short article, we have provided an answer to the question, “Can you eat capers out of the jar?” with an in-depth analysis of capers, ways to safely cook and consume capers and how to properly store capers. Moreover, we have discussed the nutritional contents of carpers along with the health benefits and risks of eating capers. 

References

https://www.myrecipes.com/how-to/ways-to-use-capers
https://www.suitandapron.com/home/can-i-eat-this-capers

Hi, I am Charlotte, I love cooking and in my previous life, I was a chef. I bring some of my experience to the recipes on this hub and answer your food questions.