Can you boil agar agar

In this brief guide, we will address the query, “Can you boil agar agar?” We will also discuss What is agar agar and how is it related to gelatin? And What are its most popular benefits?

Can you boil agar agar? 

Yes, you can boil agar-agar in liquid, this is an essential step to be able to use it because it is commercial form which is found in the supermarkets, healthy shops and online is usually as powder, strips, or flakes form, even if added to water it won’t melt on its own.

However, when boiling an agar you should always make sure not to let your agar boil for too long or beyond its melting point, or else this can harm its gelling ability and ruin its efficiency.

What is agar agar and how is it related to gelatin?

We all know gelatin as a substance of animal origin that is made from livestock collagen and used as a stabilising and thickening agent in a wide variety of savoury, sweets and desserts  such as sauces, jelly-based desserts, puddings, and custards

Agar-agar is an Asian popular gelatin vegan substitute that is extracted from seaweed mainly from red algae. It is a white and semi-translucent vegan gelatin that is sold as flakes, powder, bars, and strands. 

Besides, agar-agar is characterised as being a colourless, odourless, and tasteless substance. These features make agar an essential culinary ingredient that can be safely used for making desserts or cooking without worrying about altering their colour, taste, or smell.

On the other hand, one last difference you should know is that gelatin can simply dissolve in warm water and it is known to melt at 95 F, while agar-agar usually sets more quickly without the need for any refrigeration thus it needs to be boiled and it will only melt at 185 F.

So now that you can distinguish the difference between gelatin and agar, let us move on to know more about this vegan healthy substance and its modes of usage to get adequate knowledge about it before trying it yourself as part of your healthy meals.

What are the most popular benefits of agar agar?

Agar agar is a healthy vegan substitute of gelatin that is mainly characterised by being free of calories, fats, and sugar however it is an excellent source of fibre.

Based on the agar constituents it is known to be a good absorbent of glucose in the digestive tract besides inhibiting the storage of excess fat and helping the body to eliminate wastes.

Due to the agar-agar fibre content, it is known to give you a satiety sensation and is used as a digestive remedy for upset stomachs or even as a laxative.

Why is agar agar used?

Agar is used as a stabilising and thickening agent in many plates making them firmer, less creamy, and jiggly such as soups sauces, jelly-based desserts, puddings, and custards.

For more detailed guidance and recipes, please click the link here

What is the best way to boil agar agar?

Always follow the  directions indicated on the package of agar agar for best results, but in general, this is the basic rule you can follow :

  • Use for each 1 cup of liquid 1 tablespoon of agar flakes or 1 teaspoon of agar powder 
  • Dissolve agar completely in hot water or any other liquid such as milk, fruit juices, or broth
  • Bring the mixture to a boil over medium heat 
  •  Simmer your mixture until it thickens 1 – 5 minutes for agar powder and 10 – 15 minutes for agar flakes
  • Stir your mixture well during the boiling process
  • Let it cool in the refrigerator before using

Is it safe to reboil agar agar more than once?

Based on the composition and features of agar, it will usually set very quickly at room temperature, however, you can overcome this by reheating and melting it a few times without affecting its properties.

Conclusion

In this brief guide, we have addressed the query, “Can you boil agar agar?” We have also discussed What is agar agar and how is it related to gelatin? And What are its most popular benefits?

Hope you found this blog useful. If you have any questions, please let us know.

References

https://food52.com/blog/17465-agar-agar-is-inconsistent-wily-mysterious-but-here-s-what-we-know

https://www.taste.com.au/healthy/articles/how-to-use-agar-agar/7bimvjai

http://loveisinmytummy.com/2016/05/all-you-need-to-know-about-agar-agar.html 

https://www.thespruceeats.com/what-is-agar-agar-p2-1000960

Hi, I am Charlotte, I love cooking and in my previous life, I was a chef. I bring some of my experience to the recipes on this hub and answer your food questions.