Can I use Swiss instead of mozzarella?

In this blog post, we will answer the following question: Can I use Swiss instead of mozzarella? We will describe the exquisite taste of Swiss cheese, compared to the classical mozzarella cheese. We will also let you know what alternatives for mozzarella cheese you can use.

Can I use Swiss instead of mozzarella?

You can use Swiss instead of mozzarella if you don’t mind a slightly different cheese flavor. They both melt similarly, but Swiss cheese has a more robust flavor than mozzarella.

Swiss cheese is a cheese factory-made by Swiss farmers since 1923 in which raw cow’s milk is used. The paste is semi-hard straw yellow, with relatively large holes and characteristic natural crust. The original cheese has a unique aroma of flowers, figs, and the smell of wood. Contains 45% fat. Maturation lasts between 4 and 12 months.

Thus, Swiss cheese is obtained from cow’s milk by hot pressing and loosening for at least seven weeks. The holes have been created in the production process. The thickness of the cheese must be between 16 and 25 cm. It is a matured, pressed and boiled cheese with a firm texture, with or without small internal gaps, elastic and smooth, with a delicate and sweet taste and a pronounced nutty aroma.

Swiss cheese can be eaten as such or with bread. It can be consumed as an appetizer or in various dishes such as salads, quinces, sandwiches, omelets, pancakes, appetizer tarts, au gratin dishes.  The delicate and impressive taste recommends it for the most pretentious dishes served with a white wine glass.

Gruyère – Swiss signature in the world of cheese

Obtained from unpasteurized cow’s milk, Gruyère is a matured, pressed, and boiled cheese, with a firm texture, with or without small internal gaps, elastic and smooth, with a delicate and sweet taste and a pronounced nutty aroma. The milk fat content of Gruyère cheese is higher than 45%, and the typical color is golden brown.

Before being marketed, Gruyère cheese is matured for a long time, which can reach a year and a half. Until 2001, a large part of Gruyère cheese was produced in France, under the pretext that it was a French cheese from the Comté and Beaufort range. 

After obtaining the AOC (Appellation d’origine contrôlé) certification, Gruyère cheese is marketed on the shell with names such as Switzerland, Suisse, or Schweiz.

Gruyère has many different varieties, depending on the duration of maturation. There is also an assortment produced only during the summer in the Swiss Alps, Le Gruyère AOC Alpage.

Appreciated for its taste and the many ways it can be used in the kitchen, Gruyere cheese can be used successfully in appetizers, main courses, and desserts.

Hard cheese slices are used in sandwiches. Melted Gruyere is ideal for cordon bleu, cheese fondue, or sauces, as well as soups. It can also be used in stews and seafood dishes, with pasta, macaroni, potatoes, or in salads, and why not for pizza.

Gruyère cheese is known as one of the best cheeses for baking, with a distinctive taste, but not overwhelming. At the same time, it is very suitable for melting, along with Vacherin and Emmental.

Gruyere is a cheese that can be served on festive occasions, as a snack with champagne or Chardonnay or Sauvignon Blanc. Unlike other cheeses, Le Gruyère is not associated with dry red wine, with white Riesling, cider, or dark beer being preferred.

As a dessert, Gruyere cheese can be used in tarts or served fresh, along with a fruit.

What about the unique taste of mozzarella cheese?

Mozzarella is a yellowish-white cheese that offers little flavor than the cheeses that we are used to, but it has a smooth and pleasant texture. Its characteristics make mozzarella an ideal ingredient to combine in many culinary preparations.

We can find mozzarella cheese in different formats, the classic rounded shape, in small balls, grated … each format offers this cheese in a state of maturation.

Buffalo mozzarella is one of the most traditional Italian cuisines; it is made with buffalo milk. It is a more nutritious cheese than that made with cow’s milk since it concentrates more on proteins, fats, and lactose.

Mozzarella is a pasteurized fresh cheese that requires cold storage. It is made with milk, rennet, and salt and the only thing that can also be incorporated is citric acid (natural additive) to correct the acidity.

Considering the nutritional values ​​of mozzarella, which caught our attention at the beginning of the reading, it seems that on the one hand, the one made with cow’s milk is healthier because it provides more protein, 18% compared to 15% of the mozzarella buffalo. 

It should also be borne in mind that cow’s milk has half the fat of buffalo milk. Still, it may be necessary to emphasize that buffalo milk offers a lower concentration of cholesterol, and also provides more calcium and magnesium.

Substitutes for mozzarella cheese

You can substitute mozzarella for any of the following: Monterey Jack, Colby, Cheddar, (smooth), Provolone, or Gouda cheese. Any cheese is soft; just make sure it melts, heat a little in a spoon, and see. (Caution: there are some cheeses such as Ricotta and South American cheeses; they are coagulated acids that do not melt).

Also, when you substitute the mozzarella with another cheese, just heat it a little in the microwave, and you will see if you like the taste or not. 

Baking and cooking mozzarella has no substitute, but with trial and error, you may find some mild semi-sweet cheese to your liking!

Conclusions 

Swiss instead of mozzarella may prove to be a good alternative. Follow our tip and heat a slice of swiss cheese in the microwave, in order to test and taste its characteristics. 

We remind you that   Swiss cheese can be eaten as such or with bread. It can be consumed as an appetizer or in various dishes such as salads, quinces, sandwiches, omelets, pancakes, appetizer tarts, au gratin dishes.  The delicate and particular taste recommends it for the most pretentious dishes served with a white wine glass.

If you have any tips or questions on the content, please let us know!

References

Tasty.co

Food.ndtv.com

Food.com

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Hi, I am Charlotte, I love cooking and in my previous life, I was a chef. I bring some of my experience to the recipes on this hub and answer your food questions.

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