Are soft potatoes bad? (How to store potatoes?)

In this article, we will answer the question “Can you eat soft potatoes?” and discuss how to store potatoes?

Can you eat soft potatoes?

Yes, you can eat soft potatoes. Soft potatoes are okay to eat if they are not extremely soft and shrivelled, do not have an excessive amount of green colouring, or are mouldy. Small contaminants, like eyeballs, may be readily removed before cooking using a paring knife or peeler. 

Open your potato bag and check for soft spots. If you find any, take them out and investigate further. To determine if a potato is safe to eat, feel it for a few seconds and look for any mildew patches or an off-putting scent.

While it’s tempting to remove the softest parts of your potatoes, you won’t get ill by eating them without doing so. At this moment in time, they will not be at their best, so be aware of this fact.

When I have soft potatoes on hand, I usually turn them into mash, bake or twice bake them, or toss them in a soup. Soft potatoes go particularly well with Shepherd’s Pie. In order to improve their taste, I recommend adding some butter, salt, and fresh or dried herbs like basil or sage.

The University of Illinois Extension advises tossing a potato if it becomes squishy, shrivels, and shrinks. The potato has begun to dry up and, although it is still edible, it will not cook properly and may taste bad.

Your somewhat soft potatoes should be OK, but you probably have additional concerns regarding when and how to store them so they keep their optimum quality.

How to store potatoes

Potatoes should be stored in a cold, dry location. Heat and moisture can induce them to grow, resulting in the appearance of those eyes. It also raises the risk of spoiling. If possible, store potatoes in a cold basement, but because most of us no longer live on farms, we must locate a good storage location at home.

Potatoes should be stored in a cold, dry location. Heat and moisture can induce them to grow, resulting in the appearance of those eyes. It also raises the risk of spoiling. If possible, store potatoes in a cold basement, but because most of us no longer live on farms, we must locate a good storage location at home.

If you have an enclosed garage or shed, you may keep your potatoes there during the winter, as they like a temperature of 45-50 degrees Fahrenheit for best preservation. Do not wash the dirt off your potatoes until just before you are ready to use them, since this dirt might increase the shelf life of your potatoes.

How to keep potatoes fresh

Tubers can survive for weeks or even months if kept correctly. Here are a few essential points to remember:

  • Look for pristine potatoes with no scratches or bruises, smooth skin, and shallow eyes at the grocery store (those little divots on the skin)
  • Transfer the potatoes to a basket if they come in a plastic retail bag so they can air.
  • Do not wash the potatoes until you are ready to use them in a recipe. The potatoes are protected from spoilage by the dirt, and keeping damp potatoes can lead to mold growth.
  • Store potatoes in a cool, but not frigid, environment, ideally between 45°F and 55°F. If you keep them too cold (in your fridge), the starches will convert to sugar, altering the flavor and texture. Dehydration is accelerated at temperatures over 55°F.
  • Too much sunshine will turn potatoes green, so store them somewhere dark and cold (like a cellar)
  • Potatoes and onions should not be stored together. Onions release a gas that causes the potatoes to deteriorate more quickly.

Risk of eating spoiled potatoes

Food poisoning is a significant danger while eating cooked potatoes. They may begin to house germs and bacteria that can cause diseases including salmonella, listeria, botulism, and staphylococcal food poisoning after a few days. High amounts of solanine in ad potatoes can induce solanine toxicity.

Nausea, diarrhea, stomach cramps, vomiting, headaches, and dizziness are some of the symptoms. Mild solanine poisoning should only last around 24 hours, but seek medical attention if necessary.

You may encounter some of the following symptoms if you have a foodborne disease.

  • Fever
  • stomach aches
  • muscular pains
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • diarrhea

These symptoms can lead to dehydration, hospitalization, and even death in extreme situations. As a result, any cooked potatoes that are more than four days old should be discarded.

Sign of bad potatoes

Here are some suggestions for extending the shelf life of potatoes, as well as warning signals of rotten potatoes and the consequences of eating them.

  • Potatoes that are wrinkled, sagging, and mushy
  • Green Spots 
  • Moldy Potatoes 
  • Smelly Potatoes
  • Soft and sprouting potatoes

 To read more about eating soft potatoes Click here

Conclusion

In this article, we will answer the question “Can you eat soft potatoes?” and discuss how to store potatoes?

Reference

https://foodsguy.com/eat-soft-potatoes/
https://www.purewow.com/food/how-to-tell-if-potatoes-are-bad
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/how-long-do-potatoes-last#health-risks

Hi, I am Charlotte, I love cooking and in my previous life, I was a chef. I bring some of my experience to the recipes on this hub and answer your food questions.