Are oranges named after the colour?

In this article, we will answer the question “Are oranges named after the colour?” and will discuss What was the name of the colour orange before orange’s fruit and its history.

Are oranges named after the colour?

No, Oranges are named before the colour oranges. The first documented usage of the term “orange” actually relates to the fruit first, according to T.A. Kenner’s book Symbols and Their Hidden Meanings, and the hue was called after the fruit.

Oranges are not actually Orange.

Orange’s word uses as fruit

The word “orange” was originally used to describe a fruit in the 13th century. The English word “orange” comes from the Spanish word “Naranja,” which was derived from the Sanskrit word “nraga,” which means “orange tree.” We ultimately obtained the term “orange” since the English omitted the leading “n.”

Early Persian rulers are said to have gathered exotic plants for their gardens, which included orange trees. The fruit was then traded by Arabs, who extended the name to Spain; Naranja is the Spanish word for orange.

The fruit was called orenge in Old French, and this was taken into English, eventually becoming ‘orange’ to represent both the fruit and the colour. Oranges won over pumpkins and carrots for the honour of naming the colour’s hue. It’s most likely a matter of time. Pumpkins were not found until much later, and carrots were not bred orange until the 16th century when Dutch farmers did so.

 They used to be a variety of colours, including yellow, white, purple, and red, but only very seldom orange. Orange trees are now the most widely planted fruit plants on the planet. From the Far East to the Mediterranean, it’s a popular crop. However, the state of Florida in the United States tops the globe in fruit production, with an annual harvest of more than 200 million boxes. 

Orange trees are now the most widely planted fruit plants on the planet. From the Far East to the Mediterranean, it’s a popular crop. However, the state of Florida in the United States tops the globe in fruit production, with an annual harvest of more than 200 million boxes.

Orange as colour

The term “orange” began to be used not just to refer to the fruit, but also to what we now know as the colour orange in the early 16th century. Before oranges were brought to the English-speaking world, the colour “geoluhread,” which meant “yellow-red,” was used to describe the hue we now call orange.

On the visible light spectrum, orange is the colour that lies between yellow and red. When light with a dominating wavelength between 585 and 620 nanometres is seen by the human eye, it appears orange. It is a secondary pigment colour generated by combining yellow and red in painting and conventional colour theory.

It is a tertiary colour in the RGB colour model. Carotenoids, a kind of photosynthetic pigment, are responsible for the orange colour of many fruits and vegetables, including carrots, pumpkins, sweet potatoes, and oranges. These pigments transform the light energy absorbed by the plants from the sun into chemical energy for growth.

Similarly, once chlorophyll is gone, the colours of fall leaves are made up of the same pigment. Orange is the colour most associated with amusement, the unconventional, extroversion, warmth, fire, energy, activity, danger, taste and aroma, the autumn and All Hallowtide seasons, and has long been the national colour of the Netherlands and the House of Orange, according to surveys in Europe and America. It’s also the colour of Christian democracy’s political ideology and the majority of Christian democratic political parties. It is a significant emblem of Buddhism and Hinduism in Asia.

History and Art of Orange

Artists in ancient Egypt and India utilized an orange colour on some of their works. Realgar is a mineral pigment used in Egypt for tomb paintings and other purposes. During the Indus Valley Civilization, orange carnelians were widely utilized, and they were acquired by people from Kutch, Gujarat. Later on, painters in the Middle Ages utilized colour to colour manuscripts.

Orpiment, a mineral, was also used to make pigments in ancient times. Orpiment was a valuable commodity in the Roman Empire, and it was employed as a medicine in China, even though it contains arsenic and is extremely poisonous. It was also used to poison arrows and as a fly poison. It was also a favorite of alchemists looking for a means to create gold, both in China and in the West, due to its yellow-orange colour. The colour orange existed in Europe before the late 15th century, but it had no name; it was simply referred to as yellow-red.

Conclusion

In this article, we answered the question “Are oranges named after the colour?” and discussed What was the name of the colour orange before orange’s fruit and its history.

Reference

Hi, I am Charlotte, I love cooking and in my previous life, I was a chef. I bring some of my experience to the recipes on this hub and answer your food questions.