Are dyed eggs safe to eat? 

In this brief guide, we will discuss the question, “are dyed eggs safe to eat?”. As well, we will discuss what a dyed egg is, how to choose eggs, how to choose the safe dye, how to cook an egg, how to make a dyed egg, and other concerns about dyed eggs.

Are dyed eggs safe to eat?

Yes, it’s safe to eat dyed eggs, but you need to take some care in choosing the greatest egg dye kits, cook the egg properly, and then store it in the refrigerator (40°F/4°C or colder), to keep it safe to eat.   

What is a dyed egg?

It’s a coloured egg. Normally you pick up chicken eggs, but you can choose different eggs. Some families use dyed eggs as a tradition at Easter as a holiday decoration, and as a happy basket stuffer. 

How to choose eggs?

At the supermarket, you can find different types of eggs, but you need to pay attention if the products are within the shelf life, if they are clean, and if they are not cracked or with any damage. So choose the eggs carefully.  

How to choose the dye? 

You need to use a safe dye, therefore a dye specific for use in food. You can find commercially or recipes of how to make natural food dyes made from vegetables and fruits, guaranteeing a product free of chemicals or harmful substances to your egg. 

How do I cook eggs?

At first, it’s important to know how to normally cook an egg, because it will ensure a safely cooked egg to eat. Below, I listed some tips for you on how you make hard-boiled eggs.

  • Fill in a pan with sufficient water so when you put the eggs they will be completely under the water and put it on a boil over average-high heat;
  • When the water boils, put the eggs there with the help of some slotted spoon, gently lowering them;
  • Now, decrease the heat to a boil and cook for 10 minutes;
  • After that, drain the eggs in a colander and put them in a dish of cooled water  till completely cooled;
  • If you are not going to eat right now, keep the cooked eggs in the refrigerator (40°F/4°C or colder) with a shelf life of one week.

How to make dyed eggs?

Now that you know how to cook an egg, it will be easier to understand how to make a dyed egg. You will do the same, but now you will add dye to the water until reaching the desired color. You can also add white vinegar, which helps the color adhere to the eggshell.   

Why should I keep the cooked egg in the refrigerator?

It’s important to know, that you can’t leave cooked eggs out of the fridge for so long, because if keep them out for further than 90 minutes or more than 60 minutes when the weather is hot, will give the chance of the growth of microorganisms in the egg and consequently put in risk who eat them.  

What risks have a cooked egg out of the refrigerator?  

If the cooked egg is kept out of the refrigerator, as usually happens on holidays, that can cause foodborne illnesses. The egg is very related to the bacteria Salmonella and if you cook and maintain the eggs in the refrigerator, you can lower the possibility of getting sick from eggs. To know more about this bacteria, click here 

How can I serve the cooked dyed eggs?

You can follow the tips to keep the cooked dyed eggs safe for consumption: 

  • You can serve the cooked eggs soon as cooked;
  • Never keep them out for further than 90 minutes or more than 60 minutes when the weather is hot;
  • Maintain the eggs refrigerated till up to serve;
  • Serve in little portions and you can replace them if needed, in the way to keep the other eggs in the refrigerator;
  • You can also maintain the eggs on ice if you want to expose them for more than 90 minutes. 

What is the recipe for cooking dyed eggs?

Clicking here, you will learn how to cook dyed eggs with natural colors or food colors with a Chef. You can watch the video for a better understanding and also see the full recipe in the description of the video.   

Conclusion

In this brief guide, we have discussed the question, “are dyed eggs safe to eat?”. We have also discussed what a dyed egg is, how to choose eggs, how to choose the safe dye, how to cook an egg, how to make a dyed egg, and other concerns about dyed eggs.

References

https://www.tasteofhome.com/article/is-it-safe-to-eat-dyed-easter-eggs/ Accessed: 04/22/2022

https://www.thepioneerwoman.com/food-cooking/cooking-tips-tutorials/a32108803/how-long-to-boil-eggs/ Accessed: 04/22/2022

https://www.thepioneerwoman.com/food-cooking/cooking-tips-tutorials/a39676066/can-you-eat-dyed-eggs/ Accessed: 04/22/2022

https://www.fda.gov/food/buy-store-serve-safe-food/what-you-need-know-about-egg-safety Accessed: 04/24/2022

  

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Hi, I am Charlotte, I love cooking and in my previous life, I was a chef. I bring some of my experience to the recipes on this hub and answer your food questions.